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Home Builder Guide III


Quiz Questions

1.Coastal environments are conducive to rapid corrosion of metals. All connection hardware must be properly protected. Galvanized coatings on readily available hardware may not be adequate or in compliance with local coastal building codes. Special-ordered hardware, re-galvanizing, field-applied coatings, or stainless steel may be required.
True
False
2.
  • Insufficient fastening can lead to total building failure in a windstorm.
  • Sheathing loss is one of the most common structural failures in hurricanes.
  • Fastener spacing and size requirements for coastal construction are typically different than for non-coastal areas.
  • The highest uplift forces occur at roof corners, edges, and ridge lines.
  • Improved fasteners such as ring shank nails increase the uplift resistance of the roof sheathing.
True
False
3. Verify proper attachment of roof sheathing before installing underlayment

  • Lapping and fastening of underlayment and roof edge flashing
  • Selection of underlayment material type
True
False
4.
  • Special installation methods are recommended for asphalt roof shingles used in high-wind, coastal regions (i.e., greater than 90-mph gust design wind speed).
  • Use wind-resistance ratings to choose among shingles, but do not rely on ratings for performance.
  • Consult local building code for specific installation requirements. Requirements may vary locally.
  • Always use underlayment. See Fact Sheet No. 19 for installation techniques in coastal areas.
  • Pay close attention to roof-to-wall flashing and use enhanced flashing techniques (see Fact Sheet No. 24).
True
False
5.Tile roofs are very vulnerable to breakage from windborne debris (missiles). Even when well attached, they can be easily broken by missiles. If a tile is broken, debris from a single tile can impact other tiles on the roof, which can lead to a progressive cascading failure. In addition, tile missiles can be blown a considerable distance, and a substantial number have sufficient energy to penetrate shutters and glazing, and potentially cause injury. In hurricane-prone regions where the basic wind speed is equal to or greater than 110 mph (3-second peak gust), the windborne debris issue is of greater concern than in lower-wind-speed regions.
True
False
6.Housewrap has two functions: to prevent airflow through a wall and to stop (and drain) liquid water that has penetrated through the exterior finish.

  • Housewrap is not a vapor retarder. It is designed to allow water vapor to pass through.
  • The choice to use housewrap or building paper depends on the climate and on specifier or owner preference. Both materials can provide adequate protection.
  • Housewrap must be installed properly or it could be more detrimental than beneficial.
True
False
7.
  • Poor performance of flashing and subsequent water intrusion is a common problem for coastal homes.
  • Enhanced flashing techniques are recommended in areas that frequently experience high winds and driving rain.
  • Water penetration at deck ledgers can cause wood dry rot and corrosion of connectors leading to deck collapse.
True
False
8.Many coastal homes have large and unusually shaped windows, which will require expensive, custom shutters. Alternatively, such windows can be fabricated with laminated (impact-resistant) glass.
True
False
9.Home builders and homeowners should consider the long-term effects of the construction of enclosures below elevated residential buildings and post-construction conversion of enclosed space to habitable use in A zones and V zones. Designers and owners should realize that

  1. enclosures and items within them are likely to be destroyed even during minor flood events,
  2. enclosures, and most items within them, are not covered by flood insurance and can result in significant costs to the building owner, and
  3. even the presence of properly constructed enclosures will increase flood insurance premiums for the entire building (the premium rate will increase as the enclosed area increases). Including enclosures in a building design can have significant cost implications.
True
False
10.If prohibited elements are attached to a building that is otherwise compliant with NFIP requirements, a higher flood insurance premium may be assessed against the entire building.
True
False
11.Floodwaters can corrode and short-circuit electrical system components, possibly leading to electrical shock. In velocity flow areas, electrical panels can be torn from their attachments by the force of breaking waves or the impact of floating debris.
True
False
12.
  • Substantial damage is damage, of any origin, where the cost to restore the building to its pre-damage condition equals or exceeds 50 percent of the building’s market value before the damage occurred.
  • Substantial improvement is any reconstruction, rehabilitation, addition, or improvement of a building, the cost of which equals or exceeds 50 percent of the building’s pre-improvement market value.
  • When repairs and improvements are made at the same time, all costs are totaled and compared with the 50-percent-of-market-value threshold.
  • Note that some jurisdictions have enacted more restrictive requirements – some use a less-than-50-percent damage/improvement threshold. Some track the cumulative value of damage and improvements over time. Consult the AHJ for local requirements.
True
False